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InterNations Featured Blog

Recommended Expat Blogs: Istanbul

Recommended Expat Blogs: Istanbul

In our InterNations Recommended Blog section we let you take the spotlight! Expat life in general is, of course, a perfect breeding ground for great, user-generated reads, and life in Istanbul makes no exception. Take your time and browse the great blogs showcased in this article!

Everybody who has spent time in a different country knows that expat life is not quite like anything else in the world. The confusion of the first few days and weeks, the slow, but steady process of acclimation, the little peculiarities and quirks that might strike you about your new surroundings: almost any situation you encounter can make for a great story. If you are so inclined and want to blog about it, of course!

Our InterNations recommended blog section features talented expat bloggers from around the world. Their offerings to the blogosphere have been selected for their great entries and high quality, whether they may be funny, informative, interesting, deeply personal or a combination of all of the above.

Let’s hear from our featured bloggers in Istanbul:

Sarah: Istanbul's Stranger

A lot of jobs will take care of everything for you-- house, utilities, car, driver, whatever. A good enough job will spare you every unpleasantness. It depends on the job. If you have enough money, you can live completely outside of everything. If that's what you want, go for it. But if you want to see what living in Istanbul is like really, do things for yourself and don't listen to the people, both Turkish and foreign, who keep telling you that you can't, or that it's difficult, or that Turks are so this or that you need help with everything.

Adrian: Postcards from Istanbul

I loved and hated how different it was from the life I left behind in the states. When I first came to Istanbul, I was determined to build my life here on my own. However, I wish I had invested in 2 months of full-time Turkish lessons. Language is an incredible barrier to finding authentic experiences and developing deep relationships in Istanbul. If I could do it over again, I would have enrolled in a class and made learning Turkish my top priority when I first moved to Istanbul.

Louis: Sirkeci Restaurants

In broad strokes, Turkey, as every place in the world, is essentially the same as every other. There are people, they live their lives, they try to find something to make them happy. They have families and kids and they eat. The differences you really notice are in the small things, the way friends walk down the sidewalk with their arms linked not allowing any other people to pass, or the way time works in a much more fluid an inexact way, which is necessary with Istanbul traffic since no one would be on time anyway.

Connie: Endings, Beginnings and Panic

Lets see, I moved from a large house in the woods with moose, bear , owl, beaver, and about 21 other people as my nearest neighbors.  I drove 40 miles rt per day to work. I now live in an apartment with 17 million or so neighbors, and I walk 2 minutes to get to work. There aren't any moose in the complex. No I didn't experience culture shock. I don't know why, but it's been a nice change of pace.

Russell: Istanbul'da ne var?

People surround you when you are at home. Not only this, but as soon as you walk to a downtown area, board public transportation or visit a grocery store, you are surrounded by people. If people easily get on your nerves, then moving to Istanbul might not be the best choice! But if being with lots of people inspires you, then you will have your fill of interesting and noteworthy incidents.

Maddie: Maddie's Vine

I have a little notebook that goes everywhere with me. I write new words I've learned in there, places I visit, places I want to visit and people I meet. This is my reference when I forget something. I bought an A-Z notebook and started my own dictionary. I write all the new words I've learned in it every day. With time you will learn so much, you will surprise yourself.

Joy: My turkish joys

In Istanbul, I have an international group of friends from Spain, Germany, France, Australia, South Africa, Uzbekistan, and Turkey. I am thankful to have met so many different people. Biggest lesson learned: You will only get out of the experience what you put into it. Just jump in.

Trici: Drawing on Istanbul

It’s a lifeboat, and I have become great friends with people I initially didn’t like much simply because they were here. But the thing you have to realize is that almost everyone leaves, and then you miss them.

Louise: One Foot in Europe

Everyday something interesting happens just because you are not used to it, little things, like people reversing the whole length of a road at top speed! I would say it took me a month to get used to things.

Diane: the daily dilk

No matter how much you mentally brace yourself, there's still going to be issues and problems you only discover upon hitting the ground. Sometimes it's better just to acknowledge that, and be more relaxed about moving internationally. 

Lidia: Hos Geldiniz

No, I wasn’t prepared. I would have taken at least a few classes in Turkish before coming here. It’s not the same as self-study. The language is the key in a society that is not fluent in foreign languages.

Are you an expat blogger and would like to be featured here? Get in touch with us!

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