Working in Italy?

Join InterNations to meet other expats where you live and read more articles like Etiquette and the Job Search in Italy with relevant information for expats.

Brandon Le Clerk

Living in Italy, from South Africa

"What I really love about InterNations? Making new business contacts and friends in real life. This is a unique plattform."

Li Wang

Living in Italy, from China

"At my first InterNations Rome Get-Together I met more expats then expected. InterNations made is so easy to settle in."

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Italy at a Glance

Etiquette and the Job Search in Italy

Are you planning on working in Italy as part of an expat assignment – or on your own? Let us give you a first glimpse of what to expect! Our InterNations guide to working in Italy covers all the essential info you need for your relocation, such as visas, permits, and tips for the job search.

Career Women

Women and men have equal legal rights in Italy. However, it may be important for expat women to know that there are slight salary differences between men and women. On average, women working in Italy with a higher education degree earn up to 200 euro less than men with the same degree.

Concerning childbirth, women get a total of five months of paid maternity leave: two months before and three months after the birth of their child. Working women may not be fired for one year after the birth of their child. It is, however, expected of them to find childcare quickly after giving birth.

Business Etiquette

Italy is different in many things. Most people are very open and friendly, curious and sometimes a bit loud, which can be a little overwhelming for expatriates from some other cultures. Socially speaking, Italians are very laid back, but when you do business with them, they do mean business.

If you are unsure of how to act when dealing with Italian business partners, read the following points carefully. They may help guide you through your first encounter, ensuring that you do not make any grave mistakes:

Finding a Job

There are two key aspects for finding work in Italy: speaking Italian and networking. Without either of these, it is near impossible to get a job. Of course, there are the usual job sites that can be found in any city across the world (www.monster.itwww.jobonline.it, etc.). However, it is essential to have some sort of social network in order to survive in Italy at all.

As networking may take some time and requires you to be present in Italy, a good in-between solution for native English speakers is to teach English for a while. Most Italians do not have command of the English language on the same level as a native speaker.

A number of English schools which are spread throughout Italy frequently look for new teachers. The payment is not bad and working hours are flexible, so you have time to explore your new city and connect with people.

InterNations Expat Magazine