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Repatriation

Repatriation poses a whole set of challenges, which are similar to what you go through when moving abroad. Belongings need shipping, administrative issues need settling and culture shock sets in again. However, the differences are not to be underestimated. We tell you how to best deal with it.

Contrary to expats, many repatriates will not be met with much understanding and acceptance when struggling to re-adjust, as people expect you to simply return to your familiar environment. Going back home may then not be easy for you and your children, even in regard to dealing with your friends and family members. But with a little bit of preparation, you will be just fine.

How to Deal with Repatriation

As is the case with expatriation, the repatriation process may seem extremely overwhelming at first. After all, there is so much to organize, so much paperwork to file and so many details to think about. But it is not that difficult if you have a clear plan of how to go about it. A checklist can be really helpful in this endeavor. It will help you to keep track of the errands you still have to run and the boxes you have to pack. Some things, such as looking for a new home, have to be planned ahead of time; others can be postponed until the last minute. While a checklist can, of course, not guarantee a smooth repatriation all on its own, it will help you keep ahead of things.

Repatriation and Your Career

With the end of their assignment just around the corner, many expats should start thinking about their career. As a former expatriate, your career prospects may have changed for the better and you will be suitable for a promotion or a whole new position in your home office. Your international experience and intercultural skills will make you an asset for any employer. If you play your cards right, you will get the most out of your repatriation. Your company at home (if you have been transferred abroad) is also the go-to place if you need help with your return. Company support is essential to make you feel at home in your former work environment again. This support may include help with finding a new home or solving tax issues.

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