Join now
Log in Join

Moving to Auckland?

Join InterNations to meet other expats where you live and read more articles like Moving to Auckland with relevant information for expats.

Sven Baudach

Living in New Zealand, from Germany

"I have been in New Zealand for almost 3 years now. A pity that I got invited to InterNations only 2 months ago…"

Eva Naumann

Living in New Zealand, from Austria

"With InterNations we have found a very nice au pair here in Auckland, who also speaks German and is a great support for us."

InterNations - a community of trust

Auckland at a Glance

Moving to Auckland

If you prefer an active outdoor life, shopping on a trendy boulevard, or relaxing on the beach, Auckland is definitely the place to be. It’s a sunny and multicultural metropolis, as well as the economic center of New Zealand. Get info for your move to Auckland in our article, from visas to the climate.

As New Zealand’s largest, most vibrant and bustling city, Auckland has much to recommend it to expatriates wishing to settle in the country. With over 30% of the population of the country as a whole resident in Auckland, the city has everything that you need, including a huge variety of shops, restaurants and real estate. With a rich heritage, dating back to the 14th century when the area was settled by Maori tribes, Auckland is a diverse city, with a multicultural atmosphere and a vibrant cultural life. Whether you prefer an active and sporty life, or one spent relaxing on the beach in the sunshine, Auckland and its vicinity have everything that you need in order to live your life the way that you desire.

About the City

New Zealand’s largest and most populous city, Auckland is the beating heart of business and commerce in the country as a whole. Auckland CBD acts as the center of New Zealand’s economic world and many international, commercial, and industrial businesses have offices in the heart of the district and in the distinctly industrial zone of South Auckland.

With more than 1.5 million residents living in the Greater Auckland area, the city is home to a varied mix of ethnicities and cultures, including those of European, Maori, and Asian descent. The city also boasts a large population of people who were born overseas, with around two in five of its residents coming from abroad. All of these figures make Auckland the most diverse and cosmopolitan city in the whole of New Zealand and these figures also include a large number of expatriates, so you needn’t feel alone if you choose to move here.

Despite rising house costs, Auckland has also been ranked as one of the more affordable cities to live in; this is due to the typically higher levels of pay that Aucklanders often enjoy, and this also contributes to the good quality of life that people in Auckland can expect to attain.

The Climate in Auckland

The city of Auckland has a subtropical climate, which means that if you move to Auckland you will live through warm and humid summer months, with winters that are damp yet mild in nature. All of this humidity can lead to high levels of air pollution, however, which the government is seeking to bring under control.

The city is also one of the sunniest areas in New Zealand, and with such favorable weather and an oceanic climate, snow in Auckland is a very rare occurrence indeed. Temperatures in summer generally reach the mid to late twenties on the centigrade scale, while the temperature in winter rarely falls far below 5-7 degrees. A moderate climate, Auckland is not a city that suffers from extremes of temperature very often, making it a pleasant and comfortable place to live, work and have fun. However, as many houses are poorly insulated and the maritime winds can quickly become biting, expats should nevertheless take care to bring warm clothing.

Visas for New Zealand

If you are thinking of relocating to New Zealand alone or with your family, you will need a visa in order to do so. There are a range of visas available for those who wish to move to New Zealand on a permanent or temporary basis, and they differ depending on your personal circumstances or needs.

If you wish to work in New Zealand it is likely that you will need a job lined up, or at the very least a job offer, in order to apply for a resident or temporary work visa. If you are an expatriate worker with specialist skills, or have a skill in an area in which New Zealand is particularly short of skilled workers, then there will be more opportunities open to you.

Citizenship options are also available for expatriates who have been working in New Zealand for some time and wish to show their long-term commitment to the country.

InterNations Expat Magazine