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Moving to Bermuda?

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Bermuda at a Glance

Moving to Bermuda

From its sandy, beautiful beaches, to its crystal clear waters, coral reefs and historical artifacts, Bermuda has a great deal to recommend itself to anybody considering a move to one of the most beautiful and tropical paradises in the Western world.

Hamilton, the capital city of Bermuda and center of activity, boasts a wide range of cultural excursions, restaurants, bars, and entertainment venues, and this is true of the island as a whole, which sprawls across 20 square miles of beautiful tropical beaches, coves, and countryside. 

The Land and Its People

Since the island’s discovery in the early 16th century by Juan Doe Bermudez (from whom the area takes its name), Bermuda has welcomed a huge diversity of travelers from all over the world. One of the most significant of these was the British, who colonized the island in the 18th century and still claim Bermuda as a British Overseas Territory. In fact, the island currently stands as the oldest and the most populated of all the British Overseas Territories. Bermuda is also well-known for giving the name to the Bermuda Triangle, an area of sea spearheaded by the island in which several aeroplanes and boats have disappeared under as yet unexplained and seemingly supernatural conditions. 

Despite usually being referred to as the Island of Bermuda, the territory is in fact actually made up of almost 200 different sized landmasses, the largest of which is called Main Island and contains most of the primary destinations, including Hamilton, Flatt’s Village, Horseshoe Bay Cove, and many other of the most visited spots in Bermuda. 

The ethnic demography of Bermuda is very diverse, creating an environment in which expats are welcomed and should have no problem fitting into the community. The permanent population of the island is around 65,000, which may not sound a great deal. However, when one considers that Bermuda welcomes around a quarter of a million tourists every year, there’s always a variety of people to talk and mingle with. Within the island’s permanent population, the ethnic groups include around 54% Black, 31% White, 8% Multiracial, and around 4% Asian, amongst others. 

Visas for Bermuda

Anybody looking to relocate to Bermuda will first need to take into account the local visa rules and regulations. Short stays of up to 180days may be possible through extending your visitor status, the maximum length of your stay as visitor depends on your country of origin, though. Travelers should also make sure that their passports have at least two free pages inside for stamps upon arrival and departure. 

For anybody wishing to move permanently to the Bermuda (or for a period of longer than the allowed visitor stay) and who are not moving to join their Bermudian spouse, it’s necessary to secure a job on the island beforehand. Following this, your new employer will apply to the Department of Immigration in order to get you a work permit. Once this has been confirmed, it’s then possible to move to Bermuda in order to work. 

The Climate in Bermuda

Situated almost one thousand miles north of the Caribbean, visitors may assume that Bermuda doesn’t enjoy the same tropical temperatures and climate. However, this isn’t the case; in fact, due to the Gulf Stream, which flows near to the island, bringing warm water along with it, Bermuda can experience extremely hot weather in the summer months. For instance, in July and August, the average temperature is around 27° C (81°F), and only drops by a small percentage in September and October. 

However, during the winter and spring months, the temperature on the island is far more mild. From December to April, for instance, the average temperature ranges from around 18-19°C (64-66°F), with highs of 22°C (72°F) and lows of around 16°C (61°F). 

InterNations Expat Magazine