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Living in Cork?

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Cork at a Glance

Living in Cork

Living in Cork can be a cultural experience due to the city's history of which traces can still be found in the form of its historical buildings. As an Irish city, Cork has a low crime rate and a good life quality. Find out more with the InterNations Expat Guide!

Healthcare in Cork

Cork is home to a full range of general and teaching hospitals, all of which provide patients with the highest possible standards of care, and have the ability to handle long term inpatients as well as serious medical emergencies. Like everywhere else in Ireland, healthcare in Cork works on a two-tier system of private and public. Permanent residents who are EU nationals are entitled to all healthcare services for free. Non-EU nationals who live, work or study in Cork are entitled to the majority of health services free of charge, however there some limitations. More information on this and advice about specific circumstances can be found at Public Health Services. As well as this, there are high quality private health providers in Cork. Any expats intending on receiving private medical care should seek international medical insurance which will cover the expensive costs. In life threatening emergency situations, the number to call for an ambulance is 112.

Transportation in Cork

Driving is Cork is mostly very straightforward. Foreigners should find Cork’s roads simple to adjust to and easy to get to know. Driving takes place on the left, and the vast majority of roads are in excellent condition. In the more rural areas on the outskirts of the city, the roads are narrow and winding and driving can be slightly affected by the large amounts of wind and fog. Traffic can get quite heavy during the morning and afternoon rush hours, but is mostly moderate. Road safety laws are strictly adhered to in Cork, for example, seatbelts must be worn at all times and drivers must have less than 0.8mg of alcohol per milliliter of blood. In recent years, Cork has invested a lot of money into the development of a good public transport scheme. The city houses a reliable and regular bus system as well as an extensive rail network, which provide easy access to destinations throughout the city.

Culture and Leisure

The entire city is famous for being steeped in rich, cultural history. Breathtaking architecture and incredible panoramic views are waiting to be discovered around the corner of every one of Cork’s rustic, winding streets. Nicknamed the ‘Venice of Ireland’, Cork is built on water, and the city center is situated on a picturesque islet in the River Lee. This unique district is a popular place to visit for lovers of sightseeing and history. Cork harbor is home to some of the most impressive yachts and catamarans in Europe. This is also a popular place to visit, thanks to the numerous sites of historic interest which surround the harbor and the beautiful natural scenery. The Church of St Anne sits on a rolling hilltop overlooking the River Lee and provides scenic views of Cork for miles around. This 17th century chapel is the home of the Shandon Bells; visitors come from far and wide for the chance to ring these iconic city bells. Another must-visit spot in the city is the world famous Blarney Stone. Local legends have revolved around the Blarney Castle since the 15th century and today the custom of kissing the Blarney Stone is one of the most popular pastimes for visitors to Ireland.

InterNations Expat Magazine