Join now
Log in Join

Aspirin(NSAID) use not tied to breast cancer risk (Guangzhou)

Aspirin(NSAID) use not tied to breast cancer risk

Researchers found that regularly taking aspirin and other NSAIDs - including daily use for more than 10 years - didn't affect women's risk of breast cancer, Zhang and his colleagues reported Monday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Survey participants currently taking acetaminophen were slightly less likely to be diagnosed with cancer than non-users - but there was no clear link between how long women had been taking the drugs, or at what dosage, and their cancer risk. Nor was past acetaminophen use, even for a decade or more, tied to fewer breast cancer cases.

"If women are looking to decrease their risk of breast cancer, there is, I think, some pretty convincing evidence that high levels of exercise and diets that are high in fruits and vegetables, reduce the risk of breast canser."

Research led by Dr. Xuehong Zhang from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston used data from a long-term study of more than 100,000 nurses in the U.S., who filled out surveys every other year about their medication use, diet and lifestyle. The women also reported any new medical diagnoses.

Out of 84,600 participants who were past menopause and hadn't had cancer at the start of the study, about 4,700 were diagnosed with breast cancer between Protected content 2008.
Researchers found that regularly taking aspirin and other NSAIDs - including daily use for more than 10 years - didn't affect women's risk of breast cancer, Zhang and his colleagues reported Monday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
Survey participants currently taking acetaminophen were slightly less likely to be diagnosed with cancer than non-users - but there was no clear link between how long women had been taking the drugs, or at what dosage, and their cancer risk. Nor was past acetaminophen use, even for a decade or more, tied to fewer breast cancer cases.

Rosenberg said she expects any future research on the link between painkillers and breast cancer to focus on whether there might be a benefit for specific groups of women or specific types of breast cancer.

" findings suggest that using these analgesics may not decrease women's risk of breast cancer," Zhang told Reuters Health. "However, women should be reassured that there's no increase in risk with long-term NSAID use,"

Guangzhou Forum