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Working in Madrid?

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Jacques Paillard

Living in Spain, from France

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Living in Spain, from Germany

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Madrid at a Glance

Working in Madrid

Madrid has a lot to offer: not only is it the financial capital of southern Europe, but it is also a key player in innovation and technology. InterNations provides you with plenty of information on working in Madrid, from business etiquette to the actual job search, and everything in between.

With Madrid’s metropolitan area being one of the largest in Europe, after major capital cities like Paris, London, and Moscow, it is no wonder that it is a common destination for expatriates looking for new job opportunities. However, Madrid, like many business hubs in Europe, has suffered from the economic and financial crisis and does not offer quite as many employment opportunities as it used to. Nevertheless, the inflow of foreign workers has not ceased since 2001 and has contributed greatly to the city’s economic activity, not to mention the increase in its pool of human resources.  

Almost 78% of those working in Madrid are employed in the service sector and in 2011 this sector represented just over 74% of the region’s total GDP. The service boom is also due to the fact that the tourism industry has been thriving again since early 2010 and represents more than seven percent of Madrid’s GDP (2015). If you are an expat with excellent Spanish skills, and are thinking of working in Madrid’s publishing business, you will be interested in the fact that Madrid is the major publishing center for the Spanish-speaking world.

The Madrid Work Ethic: Laid-Back but Efficient

Madrid offers a fairly laid-back lifestyle, which, at first glance, seems to spill over into the work ethic of the city. An expat from a different country, e.g. from the Anglo-Saxon world, might mistake this mellow mindset of working in Madrid for inefficiency when, in fact, Spanish business people require this relaxed atmosphere to work productively. The long lunch hours are a concrete example of this: aside from lunch itself, they are an environment to discuss business, settle deals, and establish contacts.

Foreigners must also adapt to local office hours: almost no businesses are open before 09:00 and close before 20:00. Although working in Madrid has become increasingly comparable to working in other parts of Europe, it is important to be aware of potential differences between your own business culture and that of Madrid.

Do’s and Don’ts

Here are some useful tips for when you start working in Madrid:

Work Permit or NIE?

The first and foremost thing any foreign national working in Madrid needs is a Número de Identificación de Extranjeros (NIE). It also serves as a Spanish tax number. To obtain an NIE, bring the completed application form and a copy of the form, your passport, a passport photograph, and proof of your current address in Madrid to the nearest Oficina de Extranjeros (Department of Foreigners).

The time between handing in your application and receiving your NIE should take between one and three weeks, so be sure to apply for it before you start your job in Madrid. If you plan on working in Madrid as an EU citizen (or a national of Switzerland, Iceland, Norway, or Liechtenstein), you only need the NIE itself, as opposed to requiring an additional work permit for Spain. See our article on working in Spain for more details.

 

We do our best to keep this article up to date. However, we cannot guarantee that the information provided is always current or complete. 

InterNations Expat Magazine