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Working in Tbilisi?

Join InterNations to meet other expats where you live and read more articles like Working in Tbilisi with relevant information for expats.

Salil Padmanabh

Living in Georgia, from India

"As I moved to Tbilisi with my spouse, InterNations has helped us make friends outside of our work colleagues."

Verona Torres

Living in Georgia, from Spain

"While moving to Tbilisi on my own was daunting, InterNations gave me the expat support that I was looking for."

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Tbilisi at a Glance

Working in Tbilisi

Tbilisi, after some economic difficulties, can now offer a wide range of opportunities to all expat planning on working here, thanks to its diverse leading industries and top sectors. Find out more about the economy, work permits, etc. and make the most of what the city has to offer to expats!

Local Economy

During the 1990s, and against a backdrop of civil unrest, Georgia's economy was in severe disarray. However, thanks to help from the IMF and the World Bank, the situation is very different today, and leading the way is the country's progressive capital, Tbilisi.  Georgia has seen significant GDP growth as well as drops in inflation. As the center of Georgia, Tbilisi's economy is driven by the country's main industries, the most important of which is food production, with grapes, citrus fruits, and hazelnuts in abundance.

Also of significance is the mining of manganese, copper, and gold. In addition to these, Georgia also produces alcoholic beverages, metals, machinery, and chemicals. While the city's oil and gas is sourced from external countries, renewable energy is in abundance thanks to great emphasis on the country's hydropower initiative. Indeed, this focus on hydropower has been driven by energy shortages that have plagued the country for a period of time.

Tbilisi's rapid progress is exemplified by the fact that the World Bank recognized Georgia as the world's topmost reformer in 2006 and 2008.

Job Hunting in Tbilisi

Those wishing to work in Tbilisi must already have a job agreement in place before entering the country in order to get a visa, and so the most valuable resource when it comes to hunting for jobs in the city is often the internet. Sites such as and Job Market are a great place to start, with a wide range of jobs listings and advice.

A list of Georgia-based newspapers can be found at Georgia Newspapers and News Media Guide, which is useful for those who understand Georgian, and wish to peruse job postings before arriving in the city. As around 9% of Georgians speak Russian, skills in this language can also be useful. As in most countries, jobs teaching English may often be found. 

Work Permits for Tbilisi

As stated above, those wishing to relocate to Tbilisi long-term should have a job already arranged. However, it is sometimes possible to enter the country and keep their eyes open for work opportunities in Tbilisi once there: Citizens of select nations can enter Georgia without a prearranged job and may remain there for a maximum of 90 days.

For those not eligible for the 90-day visa-free stay people, 30 days is the maximum period allowed before they must leave the country again.

In order to take up employment or set up a business in Tbilisi, a long-term visa and residence permit is needed. Depending on the reason for one’s move, a number of official documents are needed to support the long-term visa application.

InterNations Expat Magazine