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Culture, Shopping & Recreation

Shopping in the US

Will you be able to find all the groceries you are used to from your home country in the US? Can you go shopping on Sundays? Where to turn to if your party runs out of snacks and beverages? This brief guide to shopping in the US explains.

As you might imagine, compiling a comprehensive list of all shopping options available in the ever-changing cityscapes of most US conurbations, let alone the entire country, is a less than feasible enterprise which will be of fairly little use. Part of what makes expat life interesting is getting a feel for your new home town, and a Saturday spent shopping is a perfect way to do that.

Things of Note

There are, however, a few things of interest to be said about stores and shops in the US.

Common Types of Stores in the US

Wherever your expat life in the US might take you, you can be sure to have the following options to go shop for your daily needs:


This is where most of you will take care of their grocery shopping. In almost every supermarket, you will be able to find fresh produce, fresh, packaged meat, and a wide selection of foodstuffs, snacks, and frozen food. An increasing number of stores also carry halal or vegan products. There are a number of chains dominating much of the market; what chain you will be able to go to in your new home depends on the region, though.


Hypermarkets are in essence a crossbreed between a supermarket and a department store. Typically, they are huge standalone structures on the outskirts of towns. Inside you will find both the full range of items a common supermarket stocks, along with a wide range of tech gadgets, household items, tools, a media section, clothing, and more. This range is made possible through limited choice: usually, only very few manufacturers or brands will be carried. However, the big draw of hypermarkets is that they make it possible to buy all everyday items from the same store.

Grocery Stores

While the small, family-owned grocery store has suffered harshly from the emergence and eventual dominance of large supermarket chains, you will still be able to find a few in your town. Depending on where you live, chances are that quite a number of them will be owned by immigrants, who also stock items imported from their countries of origin.

Convenience Stores

If you do not only rely on frozen burritos, hot dogs, and chips for sustenance, you might want to take your food shopping elsewhere. If you’re looking to meet your snack food, soda, or cigarette needs, however, convenience stores are the way to go. You will be able to find at least one close to your home in most places. The limited range of goods, which usually also includes basic toiletries, magazines, and a few prepackaged food items, is often made up for by their 24/7 availability.  


Malls are, for better or worse, probably one of the most prominent symbols of American consumerism – the fact that many parts of Asia have long outdone the US in this regard notwithstanding. Malls are large shopping centers, mostly comprised of a single building, in which different stores of varying size (either individual stores or chains) are located side by side and connected by walkways. In nearly every bigger mall, you will also find various entertainment opportunities (for example, cinemas or arcades) and a food court, in which various fast food restaurants are placed around a common seating area.

Farmer’s Markets

This option might be a lot less ubiquitous than the others above. In the past years, however, the classical farmer’s market has regained much of its former popularity. This is, at least in part, due to a general trend away from processed foods and towards fresh, organically grown produce and home cooked meals. Location and climate obviously play a role in what you can purchase from your local farmer’s market, but if you have the chance, go explore the fresh tastes your new hometown and its surroundings have to offer.


We do our best to keep this article up to date. However, we cannot guarantee that the information provided is always current or complete. 

InterNations Expat Magazine