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Living in Yerevan?

Join InterNations to meet other expats where you live and read more articles like Living in Yerevan with relevant information for expats.

Peter B. Krehmer

Living in Armenia, from Switzerland

"Using the InterNations network in Yerevan helped us find a French speaking au pair for our children."

Sophie Ackers

Living in Armenia, from the UK

"The groups on InterNations helped me make connections with other expats before my official move to Yerevan."

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Yerevan at a Glance

Living in Yerevan

Life in Yerevan can be both exciting and relaxing for expats. In the summer the city is full of people enjoying the outdoor café lifestyle and eclectic food on offer, including the Armenian Xorovat (barbecue). We introduce you to the local healthcare, education, transportation and more.

The currency is the Dram (AMD), and 1000 AMD exchanges to around 2 USD. A typical lunch is around 3 USD and a good bottle of wine around 1 USD.

Healthcare in Yerevan

Expatriates living in Yerevan will need to have medical insurance, as it is mandatory for all residents. It is also recommended for expats to add or find Medical Evacuation Coverage (MEDEVAC), because whilst most hospitals provide adequate care, it may be necessary to take you out of the country for treatment and the cost of this can be high.

The healthcare system in Yerevan provides national care hospitals, regional hospitals, and primary healthcare providers. In the city, there are numerous hospitals and medical centers, including the internationally recognized Scientific Medical Emergency Hospital, Shengavit Medical Center, Armenia Republican Medical Center, and the Erebuni Medical Center.

If you are seriously ill and require an ambulance, the number to call is 103, or 911 for a general emergency.

Education in Yerevan

A high value is placed on education by the population in Armenia. Following independence from the Soviet Union, the country struggled to maintain the schools; however, in recent years the government has placed focus on the educational system and is raising standards. Most of the local state schools in Yerevan teach subjects in Armenian, though.

As such, expat parents living in Yerevan might like to consider alternative options for their kids. In Yerevan, there are many private international and bilingual schools that are popular with expats and their families. This is both at a nursery and primary level, right the way through to high school (secondary) where students prepare for International Baccalaureate and other Diplomas.

Some of the schools are English speaking and follow the United Kingdom or American curriculum, whilst others are French speaking and follow the French system. Well-known international schools include QSI International School of Yerevan, Anania Shirakatsi National Lyceum, and Dilijan International School, a boarding school situated 100 km north of Yerevan within the beautiful Dilijan National Park.

Transportation in Yerevan

Expats in Yerevan will find the city very easy to get around. Within the center, there are, next to taxis, minivans known as Marshrutni or Marshrutka that cost less than 100 AMD to take locals along designated routes. The metro is also available from 06:30 until 23:00, with prices comparable to the minivans.

Foreigners who wish to drive in Yerevan will need to have an International Driving Permit and drive on the right hand side of the road. Beware; whilst the roads are generally okay in the city, if driving outside of Yerevan you may need a four-wheel drive. Getting fuel can also be a problem outside of Yerevan, with many pumps containing poor quality and unspecified fuel.

InterNations Expat Magazine