What You Need to Know When You鈥檙e Moving to Krakow

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  • Ivan Dlouhy

    Since moving to Warsaw, I have been able to make some great friends and attend InterNations events with other expats who understand what it's like to be so far from home.

Relocating to Krakow

About the City

The oldest and second largest city in Poland, Krakow is home to over 1.5 million people in a territory of 1,023.21 square kilometers. Located on the Vistula River in the Lesser Poland region, it has traditionally been a leading center of intellectual, artistic, and cultural life, and is one the main economic hubs in Poland.

The vast majority of the population is native Poles, but there are also significant communities of Slovaks, Jews, Ukrainians, and Armenians. There is also a growing expatriate population, drawn to the city by its thriving economy and private sector.

Although Polish is the official language, many people also speak Yiddish, Hebrew, Slovakian, or Ukrainian. English is widely spoken fluently amongst the younger generations, and by many people working in the financial or economic center of the city.

The Climate in Krakow

Expatriates moving to Krakow will need to adjust to an Oceanic climate, characterized by temperate weather throughout the year. Krakow is one of the easternmost areas of Europe to have such a climate, and as near as 100km north east of the city the climate becomes Continental. Average summer temperatures range between 18 and 19.6 掳C (64 and 67 掳F), but it has been known to exceed 25 掳C (77 掳F) or even 30 掳C (86 掳F).

Krakow鈥檚 proximity to the Tatra Mountains means that the city often experiences a halny blowing or foehn wind, which can cause temperatures to rise rapidly. This can occur even in winter, where although the average temperature ranges from 鈭2.1 to 0 掳C (28 to 32 掳F), it can sometimes shoot up to as high as 20 掳C (68 掳F).

Visas for Poland

As Poland is a member of the European Union, EU/EEA citizens and Swiss nationals moving to Krakow will not need a visa, although they have to register with their local regional office. Non-EU citizens, however, will need a residence permit to stay for longer than the 90 days permitted by a tourist or short-term business visa.

Residence permits must be applied for before moving to Krakow through your local embassy or consulate and the local regional office in Krakow. As part of the application, expatriates will be required to provide evidence of a work permit (see our article on Working in Krakow), or demonstrate that they will be able to financially support themselves for the duration of their stay.

You may also be asked for proof of current residence and employment, and evidence that you will be able to return to your home country when the permit expires. Residence permits are usually valid for two years, and can be renewed for a further two years.

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Our Global Partners

  • Ivan Dlouhy

    Since moving to Warsaw, I have been able to make some great friends and attend InterNations events with other expats who understand what it's like to be so far from home.

  • Raquel Santos

    During my first month in Warsaw, I attended an InterNations event and immediately felt as if I had acquired a great network of expats contacts and new friends.

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