Nuremberg

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Living in Nuremberg

Education in Nuremberg

As there is fairly large number of expatriates living in Nuremberg, most of the local public schools have a mix of international and German students, and as such are welcoming environments for children new to the city.

The city also has a number of highly regarded international schools that would be suitable for the children of expatriates working and living in Nuremberg, most notably the Franconian International School (FIS), known for its excellence in science and music, which offers schooling from kindergarten up to the International Baccalaureate.

The local university, the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, is one the largest in Germany, and ranks consistently in the country's top ten for science, engineering and technology. The university also plays an important in the local economy, providing graduates in these areas an opportunity to work in the city's technology and engineering firms. It has received large amounts of funding from the private sector and is a member of the Top Industrial Managers for Europe network.

Transportation in Nuremberg

As an industrial city, Nuremberg exports a lot of its products to nearby Eastern Europe using Germany’s famous and motorway system, the Autobahn. Inside the city center traffic can be an issue, particularly during rush hour, but still does not compare with the traffic of larger cities like Berlin.

For those who don't drive, Nuremberg has an excellent public transportation system. The six line tram network covers 36 km across the city and carries nearly 40 million passengers every year.

The city also has an extensive subway system, the U-Bahn, and an urban, intercity, and regional train network, the S-Bahn. Both of these are easy to navigate and inexpensive, and are a popular choice of transport for expatriates living in Nuremberg without their own car.

There is also a bus network, although many passengers prefer to take the subway, train, or tram as it is usually much faster. Nuremberg is also known for being home to the Nuremberg–Ingolstadt–Munich high speed train line, which has trains that reach up to 300 km/h and connect the city with others nearby. These trains run out of Nürnberg Hauptbahnhof, which is also a stop on the IC and ICE long distance train network.

Culture and Leisure

Nuremberg is a city with a rich intellectual history, and this is reflected in the vast array of museums and galleries that are on offer for expatriates living in Nuremberg. The Germanisches Nationalmuseum, which displays the history of German art and culture, and the Albrecht Dürer's House, the home of the famous German Renaissance artist in the 16th century, are notable highlights.

The city is also home to the Nuremberg State Theater and the Nuremberg Symphony Orchestra. Nuremberg is also famous for its food, most notably Nürnberger Lebkuchen (gingerbread cakes) and the Nürnberger Bratwurst, which is smaller and thinner than most German sausages.

Like most German cities, there is a wide choice of restaurants, cafes and bars, and due to its large foreign born and expatriate communities, you can find food and drink from around the world.

Daiki Saito

"When my company decided to send me to Essen, I took a quick look at the local community and said: Please do!"

Cristina Fernandez

"On InterNations I did not only meet interesting people but I also found a flat near Bochum and settled in quickly. A great platform."

Expat Magazine